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Father’s Day is the Third Sunday in June. Any clues to what we can get Dad would be great. We might consider the following…

A Jambalaya Pot – Really?

Cook up an army-sized serving of chili, gumbo, or even, yes, jambalaya with the King Kooker Jambalaya Pot ($235). This all-in-one package includes a 10 gallon cast iron pot that’s perfect for making massive meals, a 17.5-inch bolt-together outdoor cooker boasting 60,000 BTU of cooking power and a shape that’s perfectly suited to holding the pot, two steel lifting hooks, and a thermometer for deep-frying. Friends to help you eat all the food? Totally optional.

The Joey Roth Compass – Maybe

Most of the wearable compasses we’ve seen lately have been integrated into watches — which makes this Joey Roth Compass ($75) a nice change of pace. Built around the Francis Barker survival compass, this unique wayfinding tool is made from laminated Maple and East Indian Rosewood, and produced by hand in collaboration with Shwood in Portland, Oregon. It’s limited to just 200 pieces, so whether you need it for actual adventuring or are just looking for a cool necklace, we recommend moving quickly.

Symbol Record Console- He’d Love It! …but $$$$

Vinyl made its comeback some time ago, but the record player has yet to catch up. Until now. The Symbol Record Console ($TBA) is a bench-made modern record player that pays homage to the all-in-one console hi-fis of the ’50s, but bests them with an incredibly clean, modern look. Features include solid American Walnut construction, a metal base, two 6.5-inch full-range speakers, a second, hidden amplifier and subwoofer, built-in Wi-Fi for streaming music from an iPhone, iPad, iPod, or computer, and a hand-built tube amplifier and turntable, which are set into patinated steel plates to lend the appropriate sense of style to the proceedings.

Book Bandolier – Maybe Not?

No, this isn’t a Rambo-style sling for paperbacks. The Book Bandolier ($26) is instead an adjustable leather strap that offers six loops for holding pens, pencils, and brushes, and is designed to wrap around a stack of drawing/notebooks, allowing you to travel as lightly as possible while keeping the tools you need nearby

The Urban Shelf – Totally Useful! + It Fits in The Budget

Whether you’re trying to maximize the space in a cramped apartment or just looking to have an extra spot to sit stuff when you’re on the road, the Urban Shelf ($15) is ready. This clever, portable side table can hold over four times its weight, offers two cord holders to keep chargers handy, and sports a lip on the edge to keep stuff from rolling off. Yet it folds flat, weighs only one pound, and allows you to add a table to any bed or sofa by simply sliding the bottom under the mattress or cushion. Made in the USA.

Father’s Day – according to Wikipedia

Father’s Day is a celebration honoring fathers and celebrating fatherhood, paternal bonds, and the influence of fathers in society. Many countries celebrate it on the third Sunday of June but it is also celebrated widely on other days. Father’s Day complements Mother’s Day, a celebration honoring mothers.

History – Father’s Day is a celebration of fathers inaugurated in the early twentieth century to complement Mother’s Day in celebrating fatherhood and male parenting.

The first modern celebration of a “Father’s Day” was held on July 5, 1908, in Fairmont, West Virginia, in the Williams Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church South, now known as Central United Methodist Church. Grace Golden Clayton was mourning the loss of her father when, on December 1907, the Monongah Mining Disaster in nearby Monongah killed 361 men, 250 of them fathers, leaving around a thousand fatherless children. Clayton suggested her pastor Robert Thomas Webb to honor all those fathers. Clayton chose the Sunday nearest to the birthday of her father, Methodist minister Fletcher Golden.

The event did not have repercussions outside of Fairmont for several reasons, among them: the city was overwhelmed by other events, the celebration was never promoted outside of the town itself and no proclamation was made in the City Council. Also two events overshadowed this event: the celebration of Independence Day July 4, 1908, with 12,000 attendants and several shows including a hot air balloon event, which took over the headlines in the following days, and the death of a 16-year-old girl on July 4. The local church and Council were overwhelmed and they didn’t even think of promoting the event, and it wasn’t celebrated again for many years. The original sermon was not reproduced in press and it was lost. Finally, Clayton was a quiet person, who never promoted the event or even talked to other persons about it.

Clayton also might have been inspired by Anna Jarvis’ crusade to establish Mother’s Day; two months prior, Jarvis had held a celebration for her dead mother in Grafton, West Virginia, a town about 15 miles (24 km) away from Fairmont.

Credit for what we now recognize as the official Father’s Day goes to Sonora Smart Dodd, born in Arkansas from Spokane, who invented her own celebration of Father’s Day in 1910. Its first celebration was in Spokane, Washington on June 19, 1910. Her father, the Civil War veteran William Jackson Smart, was a single parent who reared his six children in Spokane, Washington. Although she initially suggested June 5, her father’s birthday, she did not provide the organizers with enough time to make arrangements, and the celebration was deferred to the third Sunday of June.

A bill to accord national recognition of the holiday was introduced in Congress in 1913. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson went to Spokane to speak in a Father’s Day celebration and wanted to make it official, but Congress resisted, fearing that it would become commercialized. US President Calvin Coolidge recommended in 1924 that the day be observed by the nation, but stopped short of issuing a national proclamation. Two earlier attempts to formally recognize the holiday had been defeated by Congress. In 1957, Maine Senator Margaret Chase Smith wrote a proposal accusing Congress of ignoring fathers for 40 years while honoring mothers, thus “[singling] out just one of our two parents”. In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson issued the first presidential proclamation honoring fathers, designating the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. Six years later, the day was made a permanent national holiday when President Richard Nixon signed it into law in 1972.

Happy Father’s Day to all the Dad’s from the Past to the Present – 

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